Climate Pro

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Aug 6

Invest in our inspiring adaptation work while reducing your personal contribution to climate change.

We all need to act to stop the worst of climate change. But its effects are being felt right now. By joining ClimatePro, you’ll be investing in strengthening the resilience of some of the communities most vulnerable to these effects.

We don’t claim payments into our projects mean it’s OK just to carry on as usual. We believe that helping vulnerable communities adapt while cutting our own contribution to the problem is the only fair and effective way to tackle climate change. So this is about more than just giving money. It’s about all of us working together. That’s why we call those who join us partners.

To become a partner takes two things:

First, and most important is a commitment from you to reduce your contribution to climate change. This is essential. Once you’ve made this commitment, there are loads of ways to make this happen.

Secondly, we’ll need you to make an investment in our brilliant adaptation projects. If you live in the UK, we ask for a monthly partnership investment of £15. If you live in Ireland, your monthly investment will be €17.

What you’ll get from us:

Updates and stories about our adaptation projects: we’ll send regular updates straight to your inbox.

Tips and advice on reducing your contribution to climate change: as a partner, you’ll aim to cut your contribution to climate change in four main areas. We’ll give you tips and advice to do this.

The knowledge that you’re making a real difference: you’ll be helping vulnerable communities around the world become more resilient and thrive.

Click on the “Want to get Involved Link” 

environmentalillnessnetwork:

ScienceDaily reports “Limiting Global Warming Is Not Enough.”
The article discusses the Nature letter “Allowable carbon emissions lowered by multiple climate targets.”

environmentalillnessnetwork:

ScienceDaily reports “Limiting Global Warming Is Not Enough.”

The article discusses the Nature letter “Allowable carbon emissions lowered by multiple climate targets.”

mothernaturenetwork:

7 striking examples of deforestation from NASA

mothernaturenetwork:

7 striking examples of deforestation from NASA

Our food security work in Haiti

Food Security Project: Coffee, Cocoa, and Family Food Gardens

In the past weeks we have been monitoring the work we’re doing in collaboration with GIZ [the Green Libon project]. This is so we can be clear about the lessons learned and pass on good practice for the future.

Also we’ve been working on planting the coffee and cocoa plants, which had to be postponed due to the severe drought that we suffered in the area in recent months. We lost some of the purchased plants and seedlings, but still we did a good job on preserving most of the plants until they could be planted.

In the last two weeks the rains have started, and we are currently distributing the seedlings to the beneficiary associations. Hopefully in a couple of months we will have a good level of coffee and cocao production!

In Restauración, beneficiary families have been desperately waiting for the start of the planting activities on their plots. Seeds, tools and other assets have been purchased and the families received training on agroecological planting practices and soil conservation.

The target is 60 families, we’ve started working with 14 of them with some funds advanced by Solidaridad Fronteriza, and now we need to make sure that the rest get their small-scale gardens and begin to produce enough food for consumption and sale.

Bernardo Lopez with Ana Rita Abreu (photo © Fran Afonso/Progressio)

~Bernardo, Progressio Development Worker

Sustainable Forestry in Malawi

In Khombedza, Malawi, we’re collaborating with a local partner to rehabilitate ecosystems and promote the sustainable management of forests. Deforestation, often driven by charcoal and brickmaking industries, poses a major threat to the health of communities across Malawi. We’re working alongside these communities to create alternative, more sustainable forms of income, while making them more resilient to the effects of climate change

Communities in Khombedza face high levels of food insecurity. This due to flooding, drought and poor soils. Now climate change is making this situation worse. Deforestation is also exacerbating these challenges, making communities even more vulnerable to the effects of a changing climate. Demand for wood, which is used for cooking, heating and making bricks is driving this problem. And now less than two million hectares of an original four million hectares of forest cover remains in Malawi. This ongoing deforestation, coupled with farming on steep slopes has led to significant soil erosion and the loss of millions of tonnes of valuable and productive topsoil.

Mary Gomani, a small-scale farmer from southern Malawi, talks with development worker Innocent Ogaba (Marcus Perkins/Progressio)

In Khombedza, we’re collaborating with local partner Environment Africa to rehabilitate local ecosystems and promote sustainable management of forest resources. Local groups are working hard on reforestation projects and have already planted thousands of trees. These trees provide crops with protection from wind and rain, while also producing nuts that can be sold or used to supplement diet.

The project will also both establish new and build the capacity of 26 existing Village Natural Resources Management Committees. These groups will enable local, participatory management of natural resources. They will also promote non-timber forest products like bee keeping as alternative sources of livelihoods for communities that currently depend on timber forest products for income. We’re working alongside these communities to create new forms of income, reverse deforestation improve soils and enable them to become more resilient to the effects of climate change.

  • Our trusted local partner Environment Africa has over 20 years’ experience in generating action towards the protection, management and sustainable use of natural resources. Their in-depth local knowledge allows them to carry out truly sustainable and participatory development projects. Our collaboration with Environmental Africa helps bring vital skills and experience to some of the poorest and most marginalised communities in Malawi and Zimbabwe.

(Source: climate-pro.org)

Disaster Risk Management in Haiti

In Port-au-Prince, Haiti, we’re collaborating with local partner Caritas Haiti on essential work to strengthen all aspects of disaster risk reduction programmes and projects, to better address the specific needs of local communities. For vulnerable small island states like Haiti, this is a vital step in building the resilience of communities to the effects of climate change.

Small island states are particularly vulnerable to the threat of climate change. Their small size in relation to the oceans that surround them, their economic dependence on limited stocks of natural resources and their proneness to natural disasters all make them particularly at risk. In the case of Haiti, these factors are coupled with high levels of political instability and poverty. In 2011, Haiti was rated the ‘most vulnerable’ country worldwide to the effects of climate change. 

In Port-au-Prince, we’re working with local partner Caritas Haiti to strengthen the development, planning, monitoring and evaluation of disaster risk reduction programmes and projects at national, regional and local levels. This approach will better address the needs of local communities, improve coordination of disaster mitigation programmes and raise the profile of disaster risk management across Haiti. Building capacity to prepare for disasters and adapting to their effects is a vital step in improving the resilience of communities to the effects of climate change.

Key elements of the project include:

  • The structuring of rapid response mechanisms for emergency responses
  • Designing disaster contingency plans at all levels
  • The establishment of an emergency fund through development of projects linked to sustainable and resilient livelihood
  • The pre-positioning of emergency supplies and storage of non-food products as part of a preparedness strategy

One of our champion farmers in Haiti (Fran Alfonso/Progressio)

Caritas is a global federation of 165 Catholic organisations working in the field of humanitarian emergencies and international development. With a permanent presence in most countries around the world, they work with the poor, vulnerable and the excluded, regardless of race or religion. Through the wide reach of the Catholic Church, Caritas brings together local knowledge at a grassroots level with the combined expertise and resources of a global network.


Food Security in Haiti and Dominican Republic

In central and northeast Haiti, we’re passing on skills and knowledge to enable better environmental protection and management of natural resources. We’re working alongside communities to help them become both more sustainable, and more productive. This is contributing to the fight against poverty and food insecurity and helping communities make themselves more resilient.

Small island states are particularly vulnerable to the threat of climate change. Their small size in relation to the oceans that surround them, their economic dependence on limited stocks of natural resources and their proneness to natural disasters all make them particularly at risk. In the case of Haiti, these factors are coupled with high levels of political instability and poverty. In 2011, Haiti was rated the ‘most vulnerable’ country worldwide to the effects of climate change.

In central and northeast Haiti, we’re passing on skills and knowledge for better environmental protection and management of natural resources. We’re working alongside communities to help them become both more productive and sustainable. Empowering farmers, especially women, is essential to achieving this, so we’re strengthening the capacities of community-based organisations and farmers’ associations.This is contributing to the fight against poverty and food insecurity and helping communities make themselves more resilient.

The main elements of the project include:

  • Improving environmental sustainability though increases in the amount agricultural land protected or saved from erosion and degradation, and volume of water retained and controlled for agricultural use.
  • Promoting increases in production through more efficient resource management, oriented towards local consumption and income generation.
  • Facilitating improved internal operating conditions of farmers’ associations and community-based organisations, and more effective participation in processes and strategies to promote local food security.

One of our Champion Farmers

We’re working with local partners Solidarité Fwontalye and Mouvement Paysan Papaye on this project.

Solidaridad Fronteriza is a Jesuit organisation located in Dajabón, Dominican Republic. It works to promote bi-national community development based on respect for human rights. It aims to build solidarity among Dominican-Haitian border towns, and to enhance the dignity and self-esteem of rural people and people living in the border area by involving them in the process of developing their own integrated, self-managed, and sustainable communities. The main areas of work are the protection of human rights, in particular rights of migrants, women’s empowerment, capacity building and the promotion of food security through agriculture with an agro-ecological approach.

Solidarite Fwontalye is a Jesuit organisation working in Ouanaminthe, Haiti, located on the northern border with the Dominican Republic. Its vision is to promote respect for human rights, especially for migrants living on the border. Whilst championing rights is key to its work, the organisation also aims to improve migrants’ living standards so as to ensure decent and legal conditions. A key focus is to strengthen grassroots organisations so that they can contribute to natural resource management that enables sustainable agricultural production and mitigates the negative effects of climate change.

  • The total cost of this cost of this project is £1,038,524 / €1,213,487. This includes contributions from the EC and three other partners. We need to contribute £62,311 / €72,809 to this total. We have already raised £43,518 / €50,850 for years 1 and 2 of the project. Now in year 3, we still need to contribute £18,792 / €21,958 to cover the project until the end of September 2013.

(Source: climate-pro.org)

Communicating Water Awareness in Yemen

In Hodieda, Yemen, we’re working alongside local communities to help them manage water in a fair and sustainable way. Water is essential for all aspects of life, but in Yemen, climate change is making its supply increasingly scarce and erratic. Through community participation, the empowerment of women and advocacy work, we’re helping communities adapt to these problems. We’re working alongside them to overcome these challenges and become more resilient. 

Yemen already experiences high levels of climatic variability, characterised by a pattern of heavy storms and flooding, followed by drought. Most communities are dependent on agriculture and fisheries for their livelihoods, making them extremely vulnerable to this severe and ongoing water crisis. 

In Hodieda, Yemen, we’re working alongside local communities to help them manage water in a fair and sustainable way. Water is essential for all aspects of life, but in Yemen, climate change is making its supply increasingly scarce and erratic.  With a particular focus on women, we’re working to increase the involvement of local communities in decisions about this scare resource. This participation is essential for its fair and sustainable use.

Boys in the town of Jebin in the Raymah region of Yemen

We’re also increasing the awareness of key Yemeni decision-makers about the impact of climate change on water resources. This will improve their ability to predict and plan for changing weather patterns and future water needs. And alongside this, we’re working to develop the awareness and advocacy capacity of Local Councils and the National Water Resources Authority to address the challenges of climate change, resource scarcity and degradation, and water rights.

Water scarcity lies at the core of the climate vulnerabilities that communities in Hodieda face. Through these projects, we’re working alongside them to adapt to this challenge; to develop methods of fair and sustainable water use, and to become more resilient.

This project involves collaboration with local NGO ‘Yemeni Society for Protection of Environment’, The National Water Resources Authority and the WadiZabid Irrigation Council in Wadi.


(Source: climate-pro.org)

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